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Health Care at Rectory

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Health Care at Rectory

Rectory's Morgan Witter Rogers, Jr., Memorial Infirmary

Rectory's Morgan Witter Rogers, Jr., Memorial Infirmary

Rectory's Morgan Witter Rogers, Jr., Memorial Infirmary

Rectory's Morgan Witter Rogers, Jr., Memorial Infirmary

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You may ask, who takes care of the health of Rectory students? Where do they go when they are sick? What kind of health care do Rectory students receive? The DiRectory staff interviewed Mr. Newman, R.N., EMT, EMS-I, the Director of Nursing at Rectory. By reading this article, you will have a better understanding of the health care of day and boarding students at Rectory School.

The Morgan Witter Rogers, Jr., Memorial Infirmary, located between Dining and Hamilton dormitories, has served as Rectory’s health center since 1946. It is one of the most mysterious places on campus because the number of visitors each day is far less than the number who visit other buildings on campus, such as the dining hall or the academic building. There are plenty of unanswered questions about the infirmary, but today Mr. Newman is going to give us a thorough tour of The Rogers Infirmary.

Mr. Newman has been working at Rectory for 36 years. Soon after he left the Day Kimball Hospital’s emergency room, where he had been employed, he started working at Rectory. At that time, the infirmary was already established with a nursing station, medication area, kitchen, treatment room, waiting room, two bathrooms, and six patient rooms with a total of eight patient beds. However, he told us that although the interior was spacious, the medical facilities were lacking—there were limited medical supplies and equipment. Furthermore, the nurses would only handle the simplest cases and refer the rest to the school doctor, who only came in on Mondays, or they would have to send them to his office. All of these factors sometimes resulted in delayed treatment for patients.

With his background in emergency medicine and EMS (Emergency Medical Services), Mr. Newman slowly worked with the school doctor to expand the role of the nurses and lessen the need for doctor office visits, updating and improving the care that could be given at the Rectory infirmary. Today the nurses in the infirmary can perform basic diagnostic tests before patients need to see the doctor, so the physician can have a more comprehensive knowledge of the illness in advance. As a result, our infirmary can now take care of most of the illnesses that occur on campus, ranging from a simple cold, to a more serious respiratory condition. The infirmary is constantly improving their skills and facilities to help patients at Rectory recover from illness as soon as possible.

Another obstacle faced by Mr. Newman and the other nurses is to determine whether a student who comes to the infirmary is actually sick. “Honesty is one of the tenets of the Rectory Creed, and students should not joke around with saying they are sick,” Mr. Newman cautioned. Another difficult situation is when a student is sick but doesn’t want to go to the infirmary. Younger students may be afraid to go; older students think they have too much work to do, so they say, “I will get better eventually.” However, when treatment is delayed, it often takes more time for the patient to recover. All too often he hears them saying, “Oh, I thought it would go away.” Rectory teachers and dorm parents are trained to be cautious and to send students to get checked out by a nurse sooner, rather than later. Mr. Newman clearly states, “The sooner you come to be seen and start treatment, the sooner you will feel better.”

We know that we should see the nurse when we’re sick, but what are some of the symptoms that indicate that we should go to the infirmary? Generally, when you are not feeling well, you should go to the school infirmary. When you have a headache or a stuffy nose, you should consult with the nurses. Do not wait and think the symptoms will fade away. Indeed, students may eventually get better, but receiving treatment from the infirmary shortens the time they will struggle with not feeling well or prevent the illness from becoming much worse.

Rectory’s infirmary tries to keep our students safe from illness, and all of the infirmary staff are willing to help us, but only if we let them. We hope you stay healthy and keep fit, but when you’re feeling under the weather, please visit the infirmary and get well soon!

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About the Writers
Tianshu W., Staff Reporter

Hello! Bonjour! 你好!These are the three languages I can speak (English, French, & Chinese), except I am still learning French. My name is Tianshu,...

Yitong W., Student Editor

Hello! I am Yitong! I am a 9th-grade boarder at Rectory. This is my fourth term working on the school’s Newspaper. I am not only a staff writer who expresses...

1 Comment

One Response to “Health Care at Rectory”

  1. Fred Williams on May 22nd, 2016 10:56 am

    Interesting article. I have been a patient in our infirmary several times and we are fortunate to have such great care here on campus.

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Health Care at Rectory