The DiRectory

  • Rectory's winter break starts in just two weeks: Friday, December 14th at 12:40 pm. Enjoy your break!

Filed under News

Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

Back to Article
Back to Article

Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

AFP

AFP

AFP

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Early in the morning on Wednesday, January 7, 2015, the entire country of France was shocked by a brutal attack. Two armed, black-clad men rushed into the Paris offices of the provocative satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, killing 12 and wounding 11. This barbaric attack on free speech rocked the European nation to the core, prompting rallies in nearly every major city around the globe. French president Francois Hollande subsequently ordered the country to be put on the highest alert level, meaning extra security was added to all government offices, public transportation, and places of worship. All available military forces were immediately mobilized to focus efforts on finding the suspects before they could strike again. After hearing his name among the names listed as possible suspects, Hamyd Mourad, a student, surrendered himself to French authorities immediately. He was soon cleared of any involvement in the attacks and declared innocent.

What concerned experts the most was how calm the terrorists, identified as brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi, seemed while carrying out their actions. Every move of the raid seemed to be planned meticulously, right down to the getaway car. “They carried out the operation in a very calm, controlled way,” said Richard Clarke, former White House counter-terrorism advisor and current ABC News consultant. “They appeared to have fire discipline, not spraying bullets everywhere. They were people who did not look like they were wild, on some kind of spree, but who were accomplishing a military operation.” (ABC News)

After committing their crimes, the brothers fled Paris, leading French authorities on a country-wide goose chase, first reappearing in northern France at a gas station, and then again in a printing shop in Dammartin-en-Goele, France. There, the brothers took hostages and called police, expressing their desire to “become martyrs.” The French military, including France’s elite anti-terrorism force GIPN, swarmed the building. Multiple helicopters were scrambled, and snipers set up posts on nearby rooftops. On Friday, January 9th, just before 5:00 pm, French time, multiple gunshots and explosions were heard. The brothers were subsequently announced dead. All hostages survived. “The nation is relieved tonight,” said French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve in a press conference.

Internationally, the outpouring of support and displays of solidarity have been wonderful to behold. Protesters held up pens and pencils to show support for the journalists and cartoonists killed in Paris, and the saying “Je suis Charlie.” (I am Charlie.) exploded across social media and were the slogan of choice among the gatherers, appearing on many signs. “No matter what a journalist or magazine has to say, even if it is not what the majority of people think, they still have the right to say it without feeling in danger, which is the case today,” said Alice Blanc, a London student who is originally from Paris and was among those in the London crowd. (ABC News)

The French satirical newspaper attacked on Wednesday, January 7th, was no stranger to controversy, however. The paper was known for lampooning anything and everything, including religion. In fact, protests broke out when they were due to release a cover satirizing Islamic law, ending with their then current offices being firebombed and burned. Nevertheless, the editors have been unwavering in their stance against the critics. After the paper was asked by the French government in 2012 to take a step back and criticize Islam less, editorial director Stephane Charbonnier (known by his pen name, Charb) said in an interview that the world must, “Disarm [radical Islamists] with humor and don’t give them any credit.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
About the Writer
Nick S., Staff Writer & Student Editor

Nick S. is a 9th-grade student at Rectory. This is his fourth year at Rectory School, and his second year on the student newspaper. He is on the cross...

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Left
  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    Celebrating Rectory’s Centennial!

  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    Rectory Student Helps Save the Black Rhino

  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    Self-Driving Cars Will Soon Be a Reality: Can You Imagine?

  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    Former President Obama Announced Mars Exploration Mission

  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    Grand Opening of Rectory’s New Hale Elementary School and Smith Learning Center!

  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    Election 2016: Trump vs. Hillary

  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    The Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival

  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    How Can 3-D Printers Save Lives?

  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    3D Printers in the Modern Day

  • Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo

    News

    2014 Year In Review

Navigate Right
The student news site of Rectory School.
Attack on Paris Newspaper Charlie Hebdo